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Research Shows Ultrarapid Metabolizers of CYP2D6 Face Increased Risk of Hospitalization

The cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) hepatic enzyme is responsible for the metabolism a wide range of medications and other substances. For example, opioids such as codeine, morphine and tramadol are activated by CYP2D6, while several classes of antidepressants and antipsychotics are in made inactive by the CYP2D6 enzyme. While it has been shown extensively that variation within the genes controlling drug metabolism has been associated with toxicity/adverse drug reactions or conversely drug inefficacy, there is a dearth of data on the adverse health outcomes of the potential impact of extreme metabolism phenotypes (ultrarapid / poor metabolism of CYP2D6) on hospitalization and emergency department (ER) visits.
 
A recent study published in Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine “Increased risk of hospitalization for ultrarapid metabolizers of cytochrome P450 2D6” (Jun 2016) found a patient’s CYP2D6 phenotype has a statistically significant impact on the rate of hospitalization from adverse drug effects for ultra-rapid metabolizers in comparison to extensive metabolizers. The hypothesis was that participants with ultra-rapid and poor metabolism would have higher rates of hospitalization.
 
The investigators examined hospital records over a 9-year period, employed data from the Mayo Clinic Biobank on patients enrolled in the Right Drug, Right Dose, Right Time: Using Genomic Data to Individualize Treatment (RIGHT) protocol, which sequenced 86 pharmacogenomics genes for clinical use. For the study, a cohort of 929 adult patients underwent CYP2D6 testing. CYP2D6 clinical phenotypes ranged from ultrarapid to poor metabolizer, with extensive metabolizer being the reference group. There was no statistically significant difference between other CYP2D6 phenotypes and controls.
“Precision medicine within pharmacogenomics can be used to predict adverse health outcomes such as hospitalization,” the study’s authors concluded. “There may be clinical utility in pre-emptively genotyping patients to decrease health care use.”

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