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Researchers at Vanderbilt University Call for Pre-emptive Genetic Testing in CVD Patients

pgx testing

Cancer and cardiac patients are typically prescribed multiple medications due to the severity and clinical complexity of their illness. It has been proposed in numerous studies citing relevant data on statistically significant adverse medication reactions in this population that pharmacogenetic testing should be conducted pre-emptively on such groups to prevent adverse clinical outcomes.
 
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Pharmacogenomic Resource for Enhanced Decisions in Care and Treatment (PREDICT) investigated gene variants that were deemed clinically actionable based on institutionally approved clinical decision support advisors for five common DGIs (drug-gene interactions) in a clinical group of 10,044 cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients, as detailed in a January 2017 article in Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine “Prevalence of clinically actionable genotypes and medication exposure of older adults in the community.”
 
The study analyzed clinically actionable pharmacogenotypes for clopidogrel, warfarin, statins, thiopurines, and tacrolimus. The researchers reported that 91% of patients had at least one actionable gene and more than 5% of patients were at high risk of suffering strong adverse reactions. Similar studies corroborate the PREDICT researchers’ findings, according to the article.
 
Pre-emptive genetic testing should therefore be integrated into standard care models, the researchers concluded. Given the preponderance of data on DGIs such as these, the investigators called for prescribers to give greater consideration to the possibility of clinically relevant drug-gene interactions in the older adult group. “Our findings affirm that pre-emptive genotyping is likely to have strong potential to improve medication safety, efficacy, and health outcomes,” the article stated. “Further investigations correlating genotypes and medication exposures to adverse reactions and other outcomes in older people appear justified.”

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